Letter from John Spiers Associate Priest

As you read this letter preparations for Harvest Festival services will be taking place in churches across the country. Celebrations of Harvest in churches had their origins in Victorian times. Whilst Holy Trinity Amberley and Minchinhampton will be decorated with fruit and flowers our offerings of produce will be non-perishable. We will no longer be left with the conundrum of what to do with oversized courgettes and limp runner beans. Instead Stroud Foodbank and MARAH, the charity for homeless people in Stroud will benefit.

This year, though, I write in an unseasonably autumnal early September. Our summer has seen a very wet June, July and August interspersed by a few sweltering days of hot sunshine. Hurricane Dorian stalled over the Bahamas. The glaciers in Greenland are grey with pollution and melting at an unprecedented rate. Blue Planet  has highlighted the extent of pollution in our oceans caused by plastic waste. Extinction Rebellion and Greta Thunberg, the 16 year old schoolgirl, are trying to raise awareness of the need to reduce our impact on the environment.

They are right to be concerned. Changing how we impact upon our environment seems a slow process. There was research on wind turbines in the 1970’s. Only now is wind power a significant source of electricity. It is ten years since I heard a talk saying that Christians should be vegetarians because raising animals for meat has a considerable impact on the environment.

If we, as individuals, do nothing, what will harvest be like as the children of Amberley, Minchinhampton and Beaudesert schools grow into adulthood? What will harvest be like for their children?

First we need to reflect on the story of the little boy and the starfish.

One day, after a storm, a man was walking along the beach when he noticed a boy picking something up and gently throwing it into the ocean. Approaching the boy, he asked, “What are you doing?” The boy replied, “Throwing starfish back into the ocean. The tide is going out. If I don’t throw them back, they’ll die.” “Son,” the man said, “don’t you realize there are miles and miles of beach and hundreds of starfish washed up on the beach in the storm? You can’t make a difference!”

After listening politely, the boy bent down, picked up another starfish, and threw it back into the surf. Then, smiling at the man, he said...” I made a difference for that one.”

For future harvests to be as bountiful as they are today we all can make a difference if we wish, by making many little changes to how we live.

There is also a need to consider a more radical approach. In the Old Testament times there was a Sabbath (seventh) year over and above the weekly Sabbath. In this year the land was left fallow; nothing was sown or harvested (Leviticus 25). This was a dramatic approach to allowing the land to be fruitful for the next six years. As well as making small adjustments to how we live, are there one or two things that we can do radically differently that would have a significant impact on our world.
I hope that many of you will join us in celebrating Harvest and use this Festival to reflect on how we can ensure that future generations can enjoy bountiful Harvest Festivals

Reverend John Spiers