Letter from the Rector - July 2019

Celebrating Ordinary Time

As we pass from Eastertide into a long Summer of green altar frontals and vestments, and a series of ‘Ordinary Time’ readings working our way through the life of Jesus, many will see this as a wasted opportunity not to celebrate anything special over the Summer, and for many it will seem like these ‘green Sundays’ stretch on and on, until we eventually hit the ‘red Sundays’ of King- dom Season in November.

But the Ordinary Time colour of green reminds us that the ‘ordinary’, largely green, creation that surrounds us is also rather special, and it is important to find joy in that which is ordinary.

This summer I wonder if we might all think of one new way in which to engage with our creator through an appreciation of God’s creation. From the rolling hills of the North Cotswolds, to the most delicate, yet perfectly formed, green leaf found in the garden, we may imagine the creator’s hands, as if on a potters’ wheel, moulding the earth into forms of unspeakable beauty.

And in the same way we should remember all that is special in God’s ‘ordinary’ created people, for we are fearfully and wonderfully made. There is something of a tendency, especially among the young, to want to be the best or to want to be a hero. And this is a good and vital part of our souls that keeps us searching further and looking higher in our discipleship. Yet God doesn’t call us to be great Christians, he calls us to be good Christians, and through our ordinary individual discipleship, we are then woven together into and extra-ordinary tapestry of God’s Kingdom slowly being made mani- fest on earth.

All of creation is leading a dance, the perpetual motion of God’s earth and God’s people. Both in creation and in church, we find the extra-ordinary in that which is ordinary, and we find joy and celebration in what we experience every day. So this summertime, maybe we should be celebrating, not Ordinary Time, but Extra-Ordinary Time!

Reverend Canon Howard Gilbert