Rector's Letter - May 2016

I hope you had a glorious Easter - and of course, the Easter season continues until Pentecost Sunday on 15th May. We go on celebrating all that the resurrection holds out to us as hope and promise. Even beyond May, we go on being the Easter people, for we never stop walking in the light of the re-creation and renewal.

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Rector's Letter - April 2016

Vocation! Vocation! Vocation! (And yes, I think we do each possibly have three...)

Let me explain... Through work that I do with the Diocese in the role of Assistant DDO (Diocesan Director of Ordinands) I have the privilege of walking alongside some who are exploring a vocation in relation to the Church. Vocation is, however, not always about the Church! Believing as I do in a God who gently helps us discover ourselves and who longs to see us liberated into all that we might become, who cares deeply about our flourishing, I think our journey into our own wholeness is probably our first vocation.

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Rector's Letter - March 2016

One of my bugbears when I was an English teacher was that in the National Curriculum orders for that subject (what we had to teach, nurture and foster in children - and the list was extensive and ran to many pages) the word 'imagination' did not appear once. Does our world not desperately need people of imagination?

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Rector's Letter - February 2016

A book which really impressed me, which I read a few years ago and immediately loved, was one called If Nobody Speaks of Remarkable Things, written by Jon McGregor. You may well know it. In an ordinary day of ordinary events, lives are drawn together in one single event, a terrible event, which marks the day out forever. But surrounding the telling of this event, the novel is a celebration of the little things that make up our lives, told with a quiet and understated beauty.

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Rector's Letter - January 2016

The name for our month of January comes from the Roman god Janus, who was the god of beginnings and transitions. Because of this, images of him were to be found on gates, doors, passageways and endings. He is often depicted as having two heads, because he looks to both the past and to the future.

The month of January is the time we usually do the same. We think about the year that has gone - and sometimes it has been a difficult one and we are glad to close the door on it. And other years we look back with great joy at the events of the past twelve months.

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Rector's Letter - December 2015

When I visited Tanzania a few years ago, the first Swahili I learnt was 'pole pole' pronounced 'po-lay') - which means 'slowly, slowly.' I discovered a very different pace of life from the one I had been living as a curate in Harrogate, one that was absolutely and utterly engaged in ministry and mission, but willing to let space and time with friends and family enter into the day. I was teaching at a theological college out there, and staff would regularly drop in to take a tea-break - which might last a couple of hours. I might be chomping at the bit inside to mark some students' papers, prepare the next lesson, or rewrite the sermon I was preparing for the village church that Sunday, but gradually, I learnt something of what it was to slow down, and enter into a pattern that had a very different rhythm from my own life in Yorkshire. One that valued 'just being' with those in the community.

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Rector's Letter - November 2015

This month, on 15th November at 10am, we are holding a joint benefice confirmation service at Holy Trinity Church, Minchinhampton, and we will be delighted to welcome our new Bishop Rachel, who will preside and preach. Amberley Church will not have a 10am service that day, to enable us all to gather at Minchinhampton to celebrate and worship together. The 9am service at Box will take place as usual, but we hope parishioners there will also feel able to join us for this special service. We have five young people currently preparing for confirmation, and we will be joined by five other young people wishing to be confirmed from another parish. It will be an exciting day!

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Rectors Letter - October 2015

I am writing this at the beginning of September, a week after having returned from a retreat with the Sisters of the Love of God based at Fairacres in Oxford. As well as prayer and study I like to walk and pray, and did so along the River Thames - the section of it called the River Isis.

Of course, that word has come to mean something rather different now. I thought the River was named after the goddess Isis - the ancient Egyptian goddess, later worshipped throughout the Roman Empire as an ideal mother, and the friend of the downtrodden - of slaves, sinners and artisans (!). She was the goddess of rebirth, of medicine, of wisdom. But I'm wrong about it being the etymology of the River, which is more simple: Tamesas is the Roman Celtic name for the Thames, which in Latin became Thamesis. This split into two, with a section of the river keeping the name Isis, and the rest losing the ending and becoming The Thames.

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Rector's Letter - September 2015

We are approaching a very full and eventful late summer / early autumn, with much to celebrate and be involved in across the benefice! As you leaf through the magazine, you will see various adverts for these, but let me flag a few up for you here, and say a bit more about them.

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Rectors Letter - July 2015

The joy of living in a new part of the world is discovering the secret delights of the area. I am still fathoming just where I am (!), and surprised myself the other day by realising I had driven into Wales quite by accident (a very happy accident, I hasten to add!). I also discovered, what you all will already know, that if you drive over the Bridge to get into Wales, you have to pay, but they let you out for free...Thankfully I did the trip the right way: around Gloucester, through the Forest of Dean, and back via the Severn Bridge.

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